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Blanking & Punching Presses

Blanking & Punching Presses
Blanking & Punching Presses

We manufacture Blanking & Punching Presses for different branches of the metalworking industry. high quality & low price with free consultation.

Blanking and punching presses are types of mechanical presses used for cutting and shaping sheet metal. These presses are commonly used in the manufacturing of metal parts for a wide range of applications, from automotive components to household appliances.

Blanking & Punching Presses

Blanking presses are used for cutting sheet metal into flat shapes, while punching presses are used for cutting holes or shaping sheet metal into specific forms.

The operation of a blanking and punching press involves the following steps:

  1. Sheet metal preparation: The sheet metal to be cut or shaped is first prepared by cutting it to the desired size and shape.
  2. Loading the sheet metal into the press: The sheet metal is then loaded into the press, and the cutting or shaping die is positioned according to the desired shape or pattern.
  3. Activating the press: Once the sheet metal is in position, the press is activated, and the die is pressed against the sheet metal with a force that is determined by the application.
  4. Cutting or shaping the metal: As the die applies pressure to the sheet metal, it is cut or shaped according to the design of the die. The metal that is cut away is referred to as the scrap material.
  5. Ejecting the finished part: Once the cutting or shaping process is complete, the press is opened, and the finished part is ejected from the die cavity. The scrap material is typically collected and recycled.

Blanking and punching presses offer several advantages, including:

  1. High production rates: Blanking and punching presses are capable of producing large numbers of metal parts in a relatively short amount of time.
  2. Precision cutting and shaping: The use of a die ensures that the finished parts are cut or shaped with a high degree of precision and accuracy.
  3. Reduced material waste: The scrap material generated during the cutting or shaping process can often be recycled, reducing material waste and lowering production costs.

However, there are also some disadvantages to using blanking and punching presses, including:

  1. Limited to certain shapes and sizes: The use of a die means that these presses are limited to cutting or shaping sheet metal into specific shapes and sizes.
  2. Initial investment cost: The cost of purchasing and maintaining a blanking or punching press can be high, which may be a barrier to entry for smaller businesses or those with limited budgets.
  3. Safety concerns: The use of these presses requires proper training and safety precautions to prevent accidents or injuries.

Sheet Metal Preparation

Sheet metal preparation is a critical step in the process of manufacturing metal parts using blanking and punching presses. The quality of the sheet metal used can have a significant impact on the finished product, including its strength, durability, and overall appearance.

Here are some common steps involved in sheet metal preparation for use in blanking and punching presses:

  1. Material selection: The first step in sheet metal preparation is selecting the right type of material for the specific application. Sheet metal comes in a range of materials, including steel, aluminum, copper, brass, and others. The material selection will depend on factors such as the required strength, corrosion resistance, and appearance of the finished product.
  2. Material thickness: The thickness of the sheet metal is also an important factor to consider. Thicker materials will require more force to cut or shape, while thinner materials may be more prone to deformation or damage during the cutting process. The thickness of the sheet metal must be carefully considered to ensure that the finished product meets the required specifications.
  3. Cutting the sheet metal: Once the sheet metal has been selected and its thickness has been determined, it needs to be cut to the desired size and shape. This can be done using a variety of methods, such as shearing, laser cutting, or plasma cutting. The method chosen will depend on the specific application and the equipment available.
  4. Deburring: After the sheet metal has been cut, it may have sharp edges or burrs that need to be removed. This can be done using a deburring tool or by filing the edges by hand. Removing the burrs helps to ensure that the finished product has a smooth, even surface and minimizes the risk of injury during handling.
  5. Cleaning: Finally, the sheet metal should be thoroughly cleaned before it is used in the blanking or punching press. Any dirt, oil, or other contaminants on the surface of the metal can interfere with the cutting process or affect the quality of the finished product. Cleaning can be done using a variety of methods, including wiping with a solvent or using a degreaser.

Loading the Sheet Metal into the Press

Loading the sheet metal into the blanking or punching press is a critical step in the manufacturing process. It is important to ensure that the sheet metal is properly aligned and secured in the press to prevent damage to the material or the press itself.

Here are some common steps involved in loading sheet metal into a blanking or punching press:

  1. Positioning the sheet metal: The first step in loading sheet metal into the press is to position it correctly. The metal should be aligned with the cutting or punching die, and any holes or other features should be properly aligned with the corresponding tooling in the press.
  2. Clamping the material: Once the sheet metal is in position, it must be clamped securely in place. The clamps should be adjusted to apply enough pressure to hold the metal firmly in place, but not so much that it causes deformation or damage to the material.
  3. Adjusting the press settings: Depending on the specific application, the press settings may need to be adjusted before the cutting or punching process can begin. This may include setting the cutting depth, adjusting the speed of the press, or changing the cutting or punching die.
  4. Starting the press: Once the material is properly aligned and secured, and the press settings have been adjusted, the cutting or punching process can begin. The operator will start the press using the controls on the machine, and the material will be cut or punched according to the settings and tooling in the press.
  5. Unloading the material: After the cutting or punching process is complete, the material must be removed from the press. The clamps are released, and the sheet metal is removed from the machine. The material may be inspected at this point to ensure that it meets the required specifications, and any necessary secondary operations can be performed before the finished part is ready.

Activating the Press

Activating the press is the process of starting the machine to perform the desired operation. This process involves setting up the press, aligning the workpiece, selecting the appropriate tooling, and configuring the machine controls. Here are the general steps for activating a press:

  1. Set up the press: The first step is to set up the press for the specific operation that will be performed. This involves selecting the correct tooling, adjusting the clamps, and setting up any other required features such as the feeder or the stripper.
  2. Align the workpiece: The workpiece must be properly aligned with the tooling in the press. This is typically done by positioning the workpiece in the die and aligning it with the punch.
  3. Configure the machine controls: The press controls must be configured to perform the desired operation. This may include setting the press force, the press speed, and the press stroke. The operator must also set the press to the correct mode, such as manual or automatic.
  4. Activate the press: Once the press is set up and configured, the operator can activate the machine. This is typically done by pressing a button or foot pedal. The press will then perform the operation, such as stamping, forming, or punching.
  5. Monitor the operation: While the press is running, the operator must monitor the machine and the workpiece to ensure that everything is functioning properly. This includes monitoring the press speed, the workpiece alignment, and the tooling. The operator must also watch for any issues such as jams or misfeeds.
  6. Deactivate the press: Once the operation is complete, the operator must deactivate the press. This involves stopping the machine and ensuring that the workpiece is properly released from the tooling. The operator can then remove the workpiece and prepare the machine for the next operation.

Cutting and Shaping the Metal

Cutting and shaping the metal is the main purpose of using a press. The cutting or shaping process is performed by the tooling and dies installed on the press. Here are the general steps for cutting or shaping the metal using a press:

  1. Set up the press: The first step is to set up the press for the specific cutting or shaping operation that will be performed. This involves selecting the correct tooling and configuring the press controls.
  2. Load the sheet metal: The sheet metal must be properly loaded into the press. This may involve manually placing the metal onto the tooling or using an automated feeder to load the metal.
  3. Perform the cutting or shaping operation: Once the metal is loaded into the press, the operator can activate the machine to perform the desired cutting or shaping operation. This may include punching, shearing, or bending the metal.
  4. Monitor the operation: While the press is running, the operator must monitor the machine and the metal to ensure that everything is functioning properly. This includes monitoring the press speed, the metal alignment, and the tooling. The operator must also watch for any issues such as jams or misfeeds.
  5. Deactivate the press: Once the cutting or shaping operation is complete, the operator must deactivate the press. This involves stopping the machine and ensuring that the metal is properly released from the tooling. The operator can then remove the metal and prepare the machine for the next operation.
  6. Inspect the finished product: After the metal has been cut or shaped, it is important to inspect the finished product to ensure that it meets the required specifications. This may involve checking for burrs, measuring dimensions, or performing other quality control checks.

Ejecting the Finished Part

After the cutting or shaping operation is complete, the finished part must be ejected from the press. The method of ejection depends on the type of press and the specific tooling used for the operation.

For example, if the press has a simple punch and die setup, the operator may manually remove the finished part from the die after the press completes its stroke. Alternatively, if the press has an automated feeder or conveyor system, the finished part may be ejected onto a conveyor belt or into a bin for further processing.

In some cases, the press may be equipped with an automatic ejection system that uses air or hydraulic power to push the finished part out of the die after the cutting or shaping operation is complete.

Regardless of the ejection method, it is important to ensure that the finished part is removed safely and without causing damage. The operator should always wear appropriate safety gear and follow the proper procedures for removing the finished part from the press.

EMS Metalworking Machinery

We design, manufacture and assembly metalworking machinery such as:

  • Hydraulic transfer press
  • Glass mosaic press
  • Hydraulic deep drawing press
  • Casting press
  • Hydraulic cold forming press
  • Hydroforming press
  • Composite press
  • Silicone rubber moulding press
  • Brake pad press
  • Melamine press
  • SMC & BMC Press
  • Labrotaroy press
  • Edge cutting trimming machine
  • Edge curling machine
  • Trimming beading machine
  • Trimming joggling machine
  • Cookware production line
  • Pipe bending machine
  • Profile bending machine
  • Bandsaw for metal
  • Cylindrical welding machine
  • Horizontal pres and cookware
  • Kitchenware, hotelware
  • Bakeware and cuttlery production machinery

as a complete line as well as an individual machine such as:

  • Edge cutting trimming beading machines
  • Polishing and grinding machines for pot and pans
  • Hydraulic drawing presses
  • Circle blanking machines
  • Riveting machine
  • Hole punching machines
  • Press feeding machine

You can check our machinery at work at: EMS Metalworking Machinery – YouTube

Applications:

  • Beading and ribbing
  • Flanging
  • Trimming
  • Curling
  • Lock-seaming
  • Ribbing
  • Flange-punching